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New Year’s Thai Sauce for Oysters


First, I would love to have mouthwatering photos of fresh, succulent oysters, glistening under the spell of my dipping sauce.  But alas, the shucking big snow storm this week kept my delivery from getting from the Chelsea Market to me in middleofnowhereville, and my dinner guests from being my oyster sauce guinea pigs.

So you'll have to take my word for it, that it both tastes and looks spectacular.

Thai food typically has a balance of four flavors: salty, sweet, sour, and spicy.  This sauce is no exception, with sour lime, salty fish sauce, spicy thai bird chili (frozen from this year's garden), and a little sugar to balance it all out.  I am a purest when it comes to slurping down those bivalve blobs of heaven, often eating them plain, or with just the slightest drizzle of a classic mignonette sauce, but there is something about this sour-herbal-savoriness that thrills me.

It will also look like confetti in a bowl for your new years fete.

Oh, and with all of the extra herbs and limes you have, try out a mint & thai basil mojito.

10...9...8...7...6....


Thai Sauce for Oysters
by Catie

Makes about 1/3 cup.

2 tablespoons warm water
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 cup lime juice, from about 1 lime
1 1/2 tablespoons Thai Fish Sauce (Nam Pla), available at asian food markets
1/2 teaspoon thai bird chili, finely minced
1/2 teaspoon fresh cilantro, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon fresh mint, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon fresh basil, use thai basil if available, finely chopped

In a small bowl dissolve the sugar in the warm water.  Add lime juice, fish sauce, and chili.  Chill until ready to use.  Add fresh herbs just before serving.



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Catie Baumer Schwalb is a chef, food writer and photographer, who splits her life between the city and the country. Not too long ago Catie was a New York City based actress and playwright for more than a decade. She has her Master of Fine Arts from the National Theater Conservatory, and her Grand Diplôme in classic culinary arts from the French Culinary Institute in New York City. ... Read More

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